Monthly Archives: March 2016

Science describes the behavioral traits of cats (and humans)

Findings from nearly 3,000 feline evaluations suggest cats have five primary personality traits: skittish, outgoing, dominant, spontaneous and friendly, researchers in Australia say. The traits correlate to human personality traits of neurotic, akin to skittish; extroverted, similar to outgoing; and agreeable, which is like friendly.

The Advertiser (Adelaide, Australia) (3/9)

More dead and injured eagles found in Delaware

On the heels of 13 bald eagle deaths on Maryland’s Eastern Shore last month, five more of the birds were found dead this past weekend 30 miles away, in Delaware, and three others were injured. It’s not clear if there’s a connection between the most recent deaths and the earlier losses, but the cases are under investigation at a federal lab in Oregon. National Geographic News (free registration) (3/22)

Echocardiograms help zoos understand cardiac disease in chimpanzees

As part of the Great Ape Heart Project, veterinarians from the Chattanooga Zoo and the University of Tennessee’s College of Veterinary Medicine worked with a physician to conduct an echocardiogram and other tests on two of the zoo’s chimpanzees. The project aims to determine the reason why captive apes develop heart disease, the most common source of mortality in captive chimps as well as orangutans and gorillas. Chattanooga Times Free Press (Tenn.) (3/18)

Scientists relocate rare Sumatran rhino, celebrate “major conservation success”

The Sumatran rhino was thought to be extinct in Indonesian Borneo until evidence that they persisted was found in 2013. Now, conservationists have captured a 6-year-old female, making contact with the species in the area for the first time in four decades. The animal will be moved to a safer location. Sumatran rhinos have the smallest stature of all the rhinoceros species, and experts estimate there are fewer than 100 in the wild. Discovery/Agence France-Presse (3/23), Time.com (3/23)

Dog raising zoo’s cheetah cubs after mother dies

When Willow, the Cincinnati Zoo cheetah whose five cubs were delivered via cesarean section earlier this month, died, the cheetah caregivers called in a surrogate canine parent. Zoo staff feed the cubs, while Blakely the dog handles socialization and cuddling. Blakely has helped with other species too, including aardvarks, ocelots, wallabies and warthogs. Dayton Daily News (Ohio) (3/24)

Vets nurse abandoned 12-day old rhino back to health

Veterinarian Panjit Basumatary and the staff at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation near India’s Kaziranga National Park are caring for an abandoned infant rhinoceros. Rangers found the calf lying in a stream, alone, in distress and dehydrated. If the calf recovers, the team will release him around the age of 3, when he is less vulnerable to predators. PhysOrg.com (3/24)