Monthly Archives: May 2013

23. Should I quarantine and provide preventative medicines and cures for communicable diseases to my new birds before introducing them to the rest of my flock?

23. Should I quarantine and provide preventative medicines and cures for communicable diseases to my new birds before introducing them to the rest of my flock?

Yes you should quarantine new birds rather than just introducing them to your flock. Do not however treat with pet store antibiotics or other over the counter medications. The new birds may or may not have anything that the resident flock may have. Just giving medication when there is no reason to do so creates problems. The new birds should be taken to an avian veterinarian who will take a sample for culturing and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The veterinary will also give a physical examination to the bird including weighing, listening to heart and respiratory system and other parameters. In some cases blood testing may be done. Depending on the species of bird and conditions, a fecal examination for parasites may also be done. A quarantine program for your birds can be defined by your avian veterinarian to keep your resident flock safe from transmissible disease.

Dental health is extremely important for bobcat

Rescued bobcat recovering after 6 root canals
Houston Zoo veterinarians performed six root canals on a bobcat found emaciated near a Texas town six weeks ago. The Wildlife Center of Texas has been nursing the cat back to health. The animal has been successfully treated for fleas, sarcoptic mange and a bacterial infection, in addition to gaining 15% of its body weight since it was found.

This is cool!

Owl anatomy confers head-turning ability
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have characterized the anatomical traits that enable owls to rotate their heads as far as 270 degrees. In addition to a single neck pivot joint and multiple vertebrae that help owls rotate without causing damage, the researchers found “backup” blood vessels that compensate for any occluded by the motion, and flexible tissue accommodates any pooling of blood during head rotation. Humans lack such adaptations, explaining our relatively stiff-necked posture. Other birds including hawks have similar traits to those of owls. National Geographic News/Weird & Wild blog(2/6)